Archive for June 2016

Monthly Archive

Teens and helmets

Guest post by: Jane Rall, UW School of Nursing

For many, bicycles remind us of warm summer days cruising through the neighborhood to a friend’s or down the street for a cold treat! As tempting as it might be to hop on your bike and fly down the sunny street, feeling the wind in your hair, one bad decision could ruin a summer and potentially a lot more. Growing up, I remember wanting to ride my bike a few blocks to a friend’s and being frustrated with my parents for making me wear my big, unflattering and not to mention uncomfortable bike helmet. My parent’s made it very clear that wearing a helmet was not optional. Like most children my age, I eventually gave in. Read full post »

FDA regulation on E-cigarettes

e-cigaretteThe Food and Drug Administration recently announced new regulations on electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), such as vape pens and electronic cigarettes. Anyone who wants to purchase one of these devices must be at least 18 years of age and be able to show valid identification at the time of purchase. Under the regulation, ENDS can’t be given out for free or sold in vending machines accessible to minors.

What are some of the reasons why the FDA moved forward with starting to regulate electronic nicotine delivery? Isn’t tobacco use among teens going down? Read full post »

Bullying and the Role of the Bystander

girl bullyingGuest post by: Kaity Skelley, UW School of Nursing

We all have memories of our childhood, some good some bad, some for better others for worse.  Whether you were a victim, bully, or bystander, bullying has impacted us all.  For me, I was in elementary school and there was a girl I distinctly remember people picking on.  Kids would call her names, make fun of her hair, or shoes, or whatever irrelevant detail it was for that particular day.  I don’t remember ever personally picking on her, but I know for a fact I never said or did anything to defend her.  I was a silent bystander.  When I was in 7th grade I learned she had taken her own life. I have always wondered if someone had stood up and not been the silent bystander if it would have changed her path.

According to research about 22% of high school students (one out of every four students) report being bullied during the school year.  Bullying is a multifaceted problem with three main players: 1) the bully, 2) the victim, and 3) the bystander.  The bystander is the person who sees the situation unfold and makes a choice to either contribute to the bullying behavior, quietly watch, or actively step in and stand up for the victim.  Research has shown that about 57% of bullying incidents stop when a peer intervenes on behalf of the student being bullied and has a stronger impact compared to adult/educator intervention. Read full post »

Consenting to intimacy

young loveThe recent trial of a Stanford undergrad has stirred up conversations about justice, consenting to sex, alcohol consumption, and unequal treatment in judicial proceedings this week. These are not light topics, but each of the issues discussed has implications for anyone raising a teen. The woman who was the victim of the sexual assault wrote an extremely powerful statement that was shared on social media. I read her statement and it has impacted me. The way I plan to approach these topics in clinical encounters as well as in my personal life (as a mom, aunt, and friend) has shifted from one of focusing on the individual to one of considering our cultural norms regarding sexual consent and women, not as fellow human beings but as sexual objects. Read full post »