Author: Teenology 101

Teens and prescription drug abuse

There is nothing safe about being your own pharmacist: Guest Blogger Alexis Barrere RN   

A pink/red cough medicine on a gray/black background.A teen worried about their weight may overhear that their sibling’s ADHD medicines was making them less hungry and choose to started sneaking some of their siblings pills every few days. Or a teen who finds an old bottle of painkillers that had been left over from their dad’s operation may decide to try them or share them with friends, assuming the pills are safe since a medical provider prescribed them. Sometimes parents even give their own prescription medications to their kids. Taking prescription drugs in a way that hasn’t been recommended by a doctor can be more dangerous than people think. In fact, it’s drug abuse. And it’s just as illegal as taking street drugs.

Teens experiment with prescription drugs because they think they will help them have more fun, lose weight, fit in, and even study more effectively. Prescription drugs can also be easier to get than street drugs. Family members or friends may have them, but prescription drugs are also sold on the street like other illegal drugs. A 2009 survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that prescription drug abuse is on the rise, with 20% of teens saying they have taken a prescription drug without a doctor’s prescription. Read full post »

Warning Signs of Depression in Teens

iStock_000014694151XSmallMay is Child Mental Health Awareness month so many of our posts over the coming weeks will cover the topic of mental health in teens. Fortunately, we have many experts in the field of adolescent mental health who have agreed to help offer information on this subject. Child and teen mental health is a topic often left un-discussed, yet it can cripple the lives of the teens who suffer and the families who love them. In this post, we’ve asked Dr. Carolyn McCarty, a psychologist at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital to answer questions on warning signs of depression in teens. Read full post »

Teen Male Health

Guest Author David Breland, MD MPH

male at docMales in general, seek medical care less often than females. This is true for adults and teens alike, but in addition to providing routine screening for issues like high blood pressure or diabetes, the annual check up can be a great source of information.  We asked Dr. David Breland, who specializes in treating adolescent male patients, tips for parents on male health. Read full post »

Teens and Fad Diets

eating strawberryWe’re entering the last few days of March which is Nutrition Awareness month, so asked a guest author to talk a bit about some of the fad diets teens may be exposed to. As we’ve mentioned before, we support the idea of eating  a variety of foods balanced with regular physical activity. Diets can be dangerous for developing teens and a meal plan that uses diet pills, restricts calories, or is limited to consuming only a select food group is typically not recommended. This post is not an all encompassing list of popular diets, but our guest, Siobhan Thomas-Smith, a medical student at the University of Washington School of Medicine, highlights some of the popular fad diets in the media today. Read full post »

More on birth control: Part 4 long term option placement and removal

This is the 4th in a series of video posts on birth control with Dr. Amies-Oelschlager. Here she discusses the placement and removal of long term, reversible, contraceptive options for teens.

More on birth control: Part 3 long term options

This is the third in a series of videos where we discuss reversible, long term birth control options with Dr. Amies-Oelschlager. See our previous post on teens and birth control for written details.

Related Posts

More on birth control Part 1 Plan B

More on birth control: Part 2 Short Term Options

 

More on birth control: Part 2 Short Term Options

We’ve had previous posts on contraception or birth control in teens, but now we’re going to break down the options. This is the second in a series of 4 video blogs where we discuss contraception in a bit more detail with Dr. Amies-Oelschlager.

Related Posts

More on birth control Part 1 Plan B

More on birth control Part 3 Long Term Options

More on birth control: Part 1 Plan B

We discussed Plan B in a previous post on emergency contraception. In this 1st post from our series of video blogs with Dr. Amies-Oelschlager. Listen while we talk about Plan B in more detail.

Related Posts

More on birth control: Part 2 Short Term Options

More on birth control: Part 3 Long Term Options

 

The big talk: Part 2 the birds and the bees

This is the second in a series of videos where Dr. Amies-Oelschlager gives advice for parents on how to talk with your teen about sex. In the first video, she goes over statistics and gives tips on how to address your family values, birth control, and uncomfortable questions. In this video, the focus is on how to start this discussion on an age appropriate level with your child.

 

The big talk: Part 1 talking to your teen about sex

This title is a misnomer on purpose. Talking to your teen about sex shouldn’t happen in one conversation, it is something that parents should discuss with their child on an age appropriate level and continue to discuss into the teen years. Talking about sex and relationships is a great opportunity to have conversations with your teen about your family’s values and to answer questions your teen may have. This blog is the first in a series of 2 videos where Dr. Amies-Oelschlager gives helpful advice for communicating about sex.