Author: Teenology 101

Teens and Sports

Sports: when a stress reliever turns into the stress producer
UW Nursing Student: Brianne Arnold

In high school I played sports, my friends all did, it was expected but I still loved them. Freshman year I played volleyball, basketball and finished it up in the spring with tennis. Some of the year I played select basketball as well. Juggling the sports, school and a social life was a challenge. However, for the first two years management was not a problem. I didn’t know anything other than being busy, going from place to place. I would do homework on the car rides, and make it up on the weekends etc.

Everything changed my junior and senior year. Suddenly, the standards for school were ramped up, expectations were exceeding my ability. The added pressure of doing all the sports that I had once loved became overwhelming. I needed to set my priorities or risk falling apart. Read full post »

Intuitive Eating

Guest post: Holly Anderson, MS Nutrition student at University of Washington and

Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) Fellow in Adolescent Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital

 

Today, the social and environmental influences surrounding food and body image make it increasingly difficult for anyone to have a normal relationship with food. Take those pressures and add to them the many variables of adolescence: confusion related to the physical changes that come with puberty, insecurities with body image and/or self, bullying, body comparisons, messages from friends/family, etc. Suddenly, it’s no wonder adolescents may feel inclined to make misguided or unhealthy changes to their eating patterns in hopes of changing their bodies. Such changes can result in disordered eating patterns, preoccupation with food, distorted body image, and/or concerning weight loss/gain.

As a future nutrition professional with an aspiration of working with adolescents, this is a topic I think about every day. How can we debunk nutrition myths and negative societal influences and instead encourage body kindness and food freedom? The best answer I’ve found is an extremely fundamental but important concept known as intuitive eating. Intuitive eating, developed and made popular by two registered dietitians, is a gentle approach to nutrition, which encourages attainment of a healthy relationship with food through learning to respond to our bodies natural hunger and fullness cues. Young children are actually the best models of intuitive eating; however, as they grow up and are increasingly exposed to diet culture, societal messaging about an unrealistic body ideal in our country, and the other influences during adolescence mentioned above, those intuitive eating tendencies can be easily lost in the shuffle. Read full post »

Staying safe using ride share applications

Ride sharing applications have increased in popularity over the past few years. Some of the benefits for the passenger include being able to hail a ride using an app rather than looking up a phone number (for a Taxi), no cash exchange (the apps charge your credit card directly), and viewing a picture of your driver and their car before they pick you up. For the drivers, they have the opportunity to see a passenger profile before they pick up a stranger, there’s no cash exchange (less likely to be robbed), and it is an opportunity to earn extra money on a flexible schedule. However, getting a ride from (or with) a person you don’t know can have dangers. In this post, a provider with expertise in sexual assault shares tips for passenger safety when using ride hailing apps.

Guest post: Julia Mitzel, ARNP

Some tips to keep you and your friends and family safe:

  1. Ask for the name of the driver when they pick you up. Although we have seen some cases where legitimate drivers have committed assault, there are also some perpetrators who borrow a car with a Lyft or Uber sticker or simply hang around places where there are likely people waiting for a car. If they are not legit, they will not match the name of the driver you are waiting for (or the make of the car).
  2. The driver should know your name. Do not provide it until they ask for the right name from you.
  3. Do not drink anything provided by the driver. I have seen a case where the woman was apparently drugged via the water bottle provided by the driver.
  4. Be assertive. Ask the driver questions. Make them think you have someone specifically waiting for you to arrive where you have asked to be dropped off. This is harder if you have been drinking, but certainly try to be alert.
  5. If something looks odd about the door locks, DO NOT get in the vehicle. Are they obviously broken, taped over, etc?
  6. Whenever possible, ride in pairs or groups.
  7. Take a photo of the license plate prior to entering the car. If the driver doesn’t like it, take another vehicle. You can also ask to take the driver’s photo. You can explain why you are doing it. If they say no, get a different driver.
  8. Text the license plate number and/or photo of the driver to a friend before leaving. These may serve as important evidence in an assault case where a phone may be lost or stolen

Time stamps, texts, calls, photos, etc. from smart phones have been instrumental in putting together timelines and assisting with prosecution.

Please be safe out there. Share this information.

What your teen should know before babysitting

Responsibility and Independence: The New and Exciting World of Babysitting
Guest Post by UW Nursing Student Michael Vaughn

Your teen may be expressing the desire to expand his or her responsibilities, skills, and job experience through babysitting. It is an exciting time, one I remember well, when hard work and energy spent playing with children is rewarded with the feeling of accomplishment from a job well done and money independently earned. Babysitting provides a flexible work option which can help your child’s confidence grow as they take on this new challenge and develop skills to use in future jobs. Read full post »

Transitioning from pediatric to adult health care: post 4

In this series on transition to adult medical care, we’ll discuss tips and strategies from parents, providers, and family advocates for those who are starting to navigate the complex process of transitioning out of pediatric care and into adult health care. Thank you to Dr Raina Voss and Joy Gehner for their help in organizing the series.

A young man with chronic lung disease

In this guest post, a parent shares their experiences both frustrating and enlightening, about being the parent of a youth with the chronic illness, asthma. Though this illness is well known, it is still complicated.

My son is now 20. He’s been followed by medical specialists since he was three weeks old, for asthma and also for treatment of the numerous bone fractures that he was susceptible to because of his medications.

People – even doctors – often think of asthma as something you’ll outgrow. But asthma is a tricky disease. In my son’s case, it didn’t seem to follow a clear path and we dealt with lots of misunderstandings and heartaches over the years, trying to figure out causes and treatments. On occasion, when he was extremely ill, we were referred for additional testing – but all that was ever identified was severe asthma. Read full post »

Transitioning from pediatric to adult health care: post 3

In this series on transition to adult medical care, we’ll discuss tips and strategies from parents, providers, and family advocates for those who are starting to navigate the complex process of transitioning out of pediatric care and into adult health care. Thank you to Dr Raina Voss and Joy Gehner for their help in organizing the series.

Transitioning to adult care: the story of one cancer patient and his family

In this guest blog post a family shares their story of working towards young adult self-management.

Patients who are cancer survivors, even if their cancer is cured, often need specialized medical care for the rest of their lives due to their past illness and the treatments they’ve undergone. The mother of a former Hem-Onc patient – 20 years old now – feels grateful to the Seattle Children’s Hospital Heart Center for helping launch their transition process. “They did a one-day conference, and half of it was about transition to adult care. We all went – me, my husband and my son. It was very useful, even if not everything applied to us because my son’s heart condition is not congenital.”

Due to the drugs he’d been exposed to during cancer treatment, this young man is at risk for a number of side effects that might only show up later in life, as well as for a recurrence of cancer. His long-term follow-up care as an adult needs to include awareness of this health history and specific monitoring for certain health conditions. This creates a steep learning curve for him – even more so, given that his treatment also created some difficulties with short-term memory. His mother sees careful note-taking as one skill he needs to develop, as he moves towards full independence in his healthcare management. Read full post »

Empowering your Adolescent who has ADHD

Guest Post by UW Nursing student Lauren Cohen Schorr

If you have an adolescent who has ADHD, you know that he/she reports having difficulty focusing, meeting deadlines, remembering things, consistently performing in school, and staying organized. As a result, at some point most adolescents who have ADHD have lived with feelings of discouragement and intense frustration.

Management of ADHD is not an easy task. I would know…

I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was 12 years old. As I started at a new school in an awkward phase of adolescent life, I thought “great, another thing that sets me apart from my fellow classmates”. I struggled in and out of the classroom to keep up and fit in with my peers. It took me several years to accept my diagnosis, but once I did, I decided to approach my ADHD as a challenge and opportunity rather than a roadblock. Read full post »

Transitioning from pediatric to adult health care: post 2 Parent Perspective

In this series on transition to adult medical care, we’ll discuss tips and strategies from parents, providers, and family advocates for those who are starting to navigate the complex process of transitioning out of pediatric care and into adult health care. Thank you to Dr Raina Voss and Joy Gehner for their help in organizing the series.

Guest post by: Joy Gehner
Parent perspective on transitioning to adult care

When you have a child with special needs or complex medical issues, it takes a long time to learn about the care they need, and put together their team of doctors and other providers. After my daughter got her multiple diagnoses, between ages two and three, it was years before I felt like we had her full team of experts in place. It was really hard work, where I had so much to learn about what my daughter needed – and so did her care team.

We’ve been developing our relationships with these providers over the many years since then. We’re comfortable with each other. I trust them to know and understand my daughter and our family. When we talk about her care, we have a shared understanding of our experience, a shared history of knowing what works for us and what doesn’t. On an even more basic level, I’m familiar with the processes for making appointments, and how billing works. I know where to park and how to navigate the buildings to the clinics we need. I even have the phone numbers of her most frequent providers memorized, simply from having dialed them so often! Read full post »

Transitioning from pediatric to adult health care: post 1

Guest post by: Dr Raina Voss

Welcome to our new series of Teenology101 blog posts, which will focus on the transition to adult health care (and to adulthood in general). Transition is a super important topic when it comes to the health of teens – for teens who have chronic health conditions, their health status often worsens during this time, and we think that might have something to do with the rocky road of transitioning to adulthood. Despite that reality, discussions about transition often get skipped during medical visits, or put off to discuss at a future appointment.

We frequently hear from parents that there are things they wish they had known sooner to prepare themselves and their child for the transition to adult care. Our goal in this series of posts is to answer some of those questions, or at least get you thinking about how to find answers. Read full post »

Keeping teens busy over the summer

Guest author: Allison Hall

While summer is a time to de-stress from the school year and spend time with friends and family, excessive free time can also have its consequences; among them prolonged internet usage, television watching and boredom. To combat this lull, summer activities are an opportunity to enhance the personal, social, educational and professional facets of a teen’s life.

Summer opportunities are beneficial to maintaining progress in school, college applications as well as resumes. Beyond the practical applications, while most activities in school are planned and required, summer opens the doors to activities which are of interest to a teen. Whether volunteering, working a job or participating in a program, an organized activity allows for choice to explore an area of learning that school may not allow for. This independence and subsequent responsibility allows teens to gain real-world experience and the ability to apply knowledge learned in school to new settings. Further, the experience of searching for an activity, crafting an application, interviewing and meeting new people are all invaluable life skills.

Underlying the summer activities is an even more fundamental advantage: discovering a sense of identity, purpose or direction. As a student, the first question one is asked is: what are you studying? What are your future aspirations? While these questions are likely unanswerable as a teen, knowing what one is interested in (or not interested in) is enormously fulfilling and useful in future endeavors.

An example of such a program at Seattle Children’s Research Institute is called Summer Scholars, which is a part of the Social Media and Adolescent Health Research Team (SMAHRT). The week-long program is designed for high school students who are interested in pursuing careers in research in various fields. The program has a strong focus on diversity, by placing emphasis on reaching students for whom these opportunities may be difficult to come by, particularly those who live outside the city of Seattle.

During the program, each student is to develop a research question of interest to them which is related to social media and adolescent health. Throughout the week the students then collect data, analyze it, and ultimately produce a poster for which they give a presentation. In addition, Summer Scholars week is jam-packed with a plethora of fascinating undertakings. Among these, tours of Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s bench lab with a question and answer session, panels from STEM workers, a Seattle Children’s Hospital tour, guidance from researchers, mentoring from alumni of the program and much more.

The program has proved rewarding to students who find that the program helps them hone research skills, identify particular areas of interest, or simply opens their eyes to the breadth of careers available to them. More information can be found on SMAHRT’s website: http://smahrtresearch.com/

How does one find a Summer Activity?
1. Research opportunities to shadow or observe individuals who work in career fields of interest
2. Look into summer programs at universities or organizations that cater to a passion or interest
3. Become a summer counselor for youth or apply for other local jobs. Help your teen write a cover letter and resume or help guide them through the application process
4. Volunteer, join an existing service project or plan one of your own